American Civil War in the News is a edited review of American Civil War related news and articles, providing collection of hand-picked 1861-1865 era history.

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WWII

Last living Confederate soldiers and widows


Latest hand-picked Civil War news and articles.

James Brown Sr., one of last real sons of Confederate veterans, dies at 99
James Brown Sr., one of the last real sons of a Confederate veteran, has passed away at the age of 99. His father, James H.H. Brown, served in the 8th Georgia Infantry's Company K and fought throughout the Civil War, seeing combat in in 19 major battles, including Manassas, Gettysburg, Chattanooga, Campbell Station and Fort Sanders.
(knoxnews.com)

At least one widow of American Civil War soldier still alive
There are a handful of widows of Confederate vets still alive almost 150 years after Lee surrendered to Grant at Appomattox. One case is fully documented: Maudie Celia Hopkins, says Martha Boltz, of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. Maudie was just a teen when she wed William M. Cantrell, who had enlisted in the Confederate Army at age 16. He served in Gen. Samuel G. French's Battalion of the 7th Virginia Infantry. By the time he met Maudie, he was a widower in his 80s looking for someone to care for him in his last years. Boltz has heard of two other Confederate widows in Tennessee and another in North Carolina, but "they don't want to be found."
(nytimes.com)

Albert Woolson was the last known surviving Civil War Union veteran
Albert Woolson smoked 8 cigars a day and lived past his 109th birthday. When he died in 1956, he was the last known living Civil War Union veteran. Over 2 million of his comrades had already died. Another claim to fame for Woolson: He was the last member of the Grand Army of the Republic, GAR. Benjamin Franklin Stephenson founded the GAR in 1866. Even though the veterans might have wanted to forget their grim war experiences, they didn't want to forget their comrades. Any honorably discharged Union veteran was qualified to join. At its peak in 1890, over 409,000 Union vets were on the GAR membership rosters.
(suvcw.org)

Last known Confederate widow found
Some might think it is impossible a Confederate widow is still alive. However, it was discovered that a Confederate widow Maude Hopkins is very much alive. She married her first husband, Confederate William M. Cantrell, an aging widower, in 1934. She was 19 and he was 86. Living alone and in his 80`s, he employed Maude to care for him. Being mindful of the moral standards, they agreed to marry so as to not bring disrespect upon her name. Confederate Cantrell was in French`s Battalion, Company A, of the Virginia Infantry. Maude cared for Cantrell until his death on Feb. 26, 1937. Following his death, she remarried and had two daughters.
(trumanndemocrat)